Make Your Own DIY Wet Jet Mop with Non Toxic Cleaner!

Looking for a simple switch from the toxic wet jet mops? A simple DIY wet jet mop with nontoxic cleaner tutorial!

Do you ever wonder what is in your cleaning products?  No?

Me either!

I never gave them a second thought until my youngest child was born.  Before that I just used what worked, was the cheapest, and got the job done the fastest.

It never crossed my mind before she started to get eczema at about two months old.  Once I saw that and I began investigating potential eczema triggers, I knew we had to make a change.

At the time both of our kids were very young and I needed to clean up fast.  There was no time to haul out a mop bucket and wait for the floor to dry.

Have you ever tried to keep a toddler off a freshly mopped floor?  No bueno.

We used a disposable mopping system for everything back then!  I had no idea of the chemicals in them until I started to look deeper.

When I looked I found out that my mop contained all sorts of terrible chemicals.  Things like:

  • METHYLCHLOROISOTHIAZOLINONE: a skin sensitizer and environmental toxin
  • METHYLISOTHIAZOLINONE: toxic to aquatic life and a skin sensitizer
  • DIALKYL DIMETHYL AMMONIUM CHLORIDES (DDAC):  allergenic and a potential asthma trigger
  • and a lot more yuck!

Sounds like something you’d want to use around your kids, right?  Nope, me either!

Check your own cleaners here.

That’s when I started to look into non-toxic cleaners.  After trying a lot of DIY cleaning recipes and coming up short, my friend Sarah recommended the Thieves Household Cleaner concentrate.  And the rest is history, my friends!

But even though I had a non-toxic cleaner, I was back to using a mop bucket.  Not my favorite, and way less convenient than a mop system.

I was still wishing for the convenience of a disposable wet mop system, but without the toxins.

Then I found the solution!

My DIY Wet Jet Mop with Non Toxic Cleaner!

I have no idea why it took me so long to figure this out, but maybe you’ve know this forever.  If so, my hat goes off to you!

You’ve probably got a really clean kitchen (and bathroom, and floors in general)! *wink*

You can buy a refillable wet jet mop!

Seriously, I know!  I don’t know why I never thought to look for it, but it has simplified my floor mopping tremendously!

Most importantly, I can use my own cleaner!

So here’s how I did it.  Feel free to follow along!

1.  I started with this wet jet mop.

I picked this one because it comes with a washable microfiber mop pad, and you can wash it over 100 times!  That’s really green and easy enough to wash and re-use.  Plus it saves me a boatload of money.

I can also buy disposable pads (that also can be washed 5 times before I toss them) too.  It’s worth it to have that option, especially since some messes are just too gross to wash away.

Looking for a simple switch from the toxic wetjet mops? A simple DIY wet jet mop with nontoxic cleaner tutorial!

2.  Then I added my own cleaner!

I liked being able to pick my own cleaner for a couple of reasons.  First of all, I already clean almost everything with the Thieves cleaner, so it made sense to try this.  I love that it is free of toxic chemicals, is completely plant based, and is safe to use around my kids.

In fact, now that we put together this DIY wet jet mop, my 7 year old has started to help with the mopping!

Not to mention…I’m saving a boatload of money!  Did you know that the pre-mixed wet jet mop systems charge about $5 per bottle of cleaning solution?  YIKES!

I pay a little under a dollar for each refill of the cleaner bottle on this new mop!

Looking for a simple switch from the toxic wet jet mops? A simple DIY wet jet mop with nontoxic cleaner tutorial!

3.  It seriously takes 2 teaspoons!

For general mopping, the wet jet mop directions suggested adding 2 teaspoons of your own cleaner!  I’ve been happy with that amount for daily cleaning.  On days when I know I will be cleaning a tough mess, I add an extra teaspoon and it works great!  It gets all the stains from the bathroom or leftovers from meals that somehow make it to the floor.

Looking for a simple switch from the toxic wet jet mops? A simple DIY wet jet mop with nontoxic cleaner tutorial!

4.  Fill the bottle the rest of the way with water and mop!

It really is that simple!  When you’re done mopping toss the microfiber pad in the wash and it will be ready the next time you need to mop.

This has been perfect in our kitchen and bathrooms, all of which are very small and have hard to reach spaces.  The floors have been very clean and it is just as easy as using the commercially made wet jet mop systems!

And I know I mentioned this earlier…but my oldest is mopping now!

That’s enough reason all by itself.

 

Looking for a simple switch from the toxic wetjet mops? A simple DIY wet jet mop with nontoxic cleaner tutorial!


Refreshing Summer Lime Agua Fresca Recipe

This cold, delicious lime agua fresca recipe is the perfect way to cool down on a hot day!

Baby, it’s hot outside!

We just celebrated Independence day and wow was it hot!  So hot in fact that I was already thinking a little longingly towards fall!

It cracked me up because I always prefer the weather of any season but the one we’re in at the time.  I bet that when fall comes that I’ll be a bit nostalgic for summer.

But until then,  I decided that a cold drink was in order.  This refreshing lime agua fresca recipe is just the ticket.

This has been one of my favorite new creations this summer.  I shared it with my friend Sarah and she told me it is great with tacos!  I think its great with anything!

What’s an Agua Fresca?

Agua frescas are a popular drink in Latin America!  It’s typically fruit blended with water to make a light infused water.

Now if you’ve never had an agua fresca, you’ll want to know something.  It’s not intensely fruity like a smoothie.  It is more like an infused water: light and refreshing but not overpowering.  That’s what makes it perfect as a warm day drink.

The Lime Agua Fresca is very easy to make.  Check out the video below!

What do you need?

So delicious and fresh!  I love this recipe so much.  You can try swapping out your favorite fruits and food appropriate essential oils to make delicious flavor combos.

Try swapping watermelon for cantaloupe or honeydew.  Swap frozen strawberries for frozen mango or pineapple.  Experiment with other citrus essential oils.  You’ll find that this recipe is so versatile!

Ready for the agua fresca recipe?

Here you go!

Refreshing Summer Lime Agua Fresca Recipe
 
Author:
Recipe type: Drinks
Cuisine: American
Serves: 2
Prep time:
Total time:
 
This cold, delicious lime agua fresca recipe is the perfect way to cool down on a hot day!
Ingredients
  • 1 cup frozen strawberries
  • 1 cup cubed watermelon
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 TBSP honey or maple syrup (or pure stevia to taste)
  • 4 drops Lime Essential Oil (I recommend Lime Vitality from Young Living)
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a blender and blend!
  2. Serve in a chilled glass and enjoy!

Have you ever tried agua fresca?  What type did you have?  Share in the comments!

This cold, delicious lime agua fresca recipe is the perfect way to cool down on a hot day!


6 Meaningless Essential Oil Terms and What to Look for Instead

100% pure essential oils, therapeutic grade, medical grade, clinical grade, locally sourced, and organic essential oils. What does it all REALLY mean?

You’ve probably seen the terms: “100% pure essential oils”,  “therapeutic grade”, “clinical grade”, “certified essential oils”, “organic”, “locally sourced”.

It is SO confusing, even to people who have casually used essential oils for a long time.

I remember when I was first looking at essential oils for our health there was SO much conflicting marketing information.  It was difficult for me to separate what was fact from what was clever fiction.

Now to be clear, I am not suggesting that companies that use these terms are intentionally trying to mislead consumers.  But I do know that essential oils are a multi-billion dollar a year industry.  It is getting harder and harder to stand out in a very crowded arena.

With hundreds of companies competing for your business it is difficult to stand out.  What essential oil companies must do is market to the end consumer.

It’s all about the marketing

Marketing is, by its very nature, designed to convince you to buy a product.  And over the years, consumers have come to believe that certain oil terms mean better oils. 

On the other hand, people sometimes think oils are less good because they aren’t “clinical” or “therapeutic” or whatever the new fad is.

In my research and in my later aromatherapy training, I found out that a lot of what consumers believe to be true about essential oils is actually false.

Today I’ll share six essential oil terms that really don’t mean much, explain what people tend to believe that they mean, and then explain what you should look for instead.

Sound good?  Great!  Let’s do this.

6 Meaningless Essential Oil Terms and What to Look for Instead!

100% pure essential oils, therapeutic grade, medical grade, clinical grade, locally sourced, and organic essential oils. What does it all REALLY mean?

100% Pure Essential Oils

What people think it means:

This oil is exactly what the bottle says.  It has only the species of the essential oil listed on the label (if it is listed).  There is nothing in the essential oil other than the pure, undiluted essential oil.  There is nothing else in the bottle.

What it actually means:

There are no standards for the use of “100% pure” on essential oils.  That means that an essential oil with this label does not have to have pure essential oils in it.  These oils may have undisclosed fillers, stretchers, fragrance enhancements, synthetic chemicals, be completely lab created, or any other combination of problems.

Basically, this is the least helpful and most abused of all the essential oil marketing terms.  Without an outside way to enforce quality and purity, companies are 100% self-policing.  Sadly most companies lack the resources to verify the purity of the oils they re-sell.

What to look for instead:

If you are wanting a pure oil, free of synthetic chemicals, undisclosed fillers, and undisclosed cheaper oils then you need to take a hard look at the quality control process of the company.  Where do they get their oils? Do they do any testing to make sure of product purity?  GC/MS testing is not enough to show whether a product has subtle synthetic manipulation, so what tests do they do other than GC/MS?

If they find an adulterated essential oil, what do they do? Do they dispose of it?  Send it back to the source?  Or do they re-sell it until they get complaints (this actually was the response that one company gave)?  An essential oil company who sells high quality products will be able to answer very in-depth questions about their quality control.  You may need to ask to talk with their research department, though, because most general customer service representatives don’t usually deal with these types of questions.

Want more? Read: The Truth About Essential Oil Labels  or Are You Using Adulterated Essential Oils?

100% pure essential oils, therapeutic grade, medical grade, clinical grade, locally sourced, and organic essential oils. What does it all REALLY mean?

Therapeutic Grade Essential Oils

What people think it means:

Generally,  people think that essential oils labeled as therapeutic grade have had extra testing to prove that they are extra potent and therapeutically active.   Also, people often believe that therapeutic grade means that the oils are more beneficial for health uses.

What it actually means:

Young Living Essential Oils first used the term “therapeutic grade” in the 1990s.  They were one of the first companies to sell essential oils for health.  Therapeutic grade was the term they used to distinguish themselves from the fragrance oils crowding the US market at the time.

Other companies started using the term once they saw how well it worked for Young Living.  Unfortunately there is no way to stop any company, even one with poor quality oils, from using this term.

There is no outside measure of therapeutic grade.  No outside agency holds companies accountable for their oils’ quality.  That is why therapeutic grade is a useless essential oil term.

What to look for instead:

Many factors influence therapeutic activity.   First the oil actually has to be authentic.  Authentic is an industry term that means that it is the pure unadulterated essential oil of the stated plant.

An experienced team of chemists should test the essential oil to find the proper levels of botanical constituents.  GC/MS testing is not enough to decide the purity or potency of essential oils. Other tests must confirm specific aspects of essential oil purity and activity.

Growing and distilling methods greatly influence essential oil quality and potency.  A quality oil seller can explain how (or if) they are involved in this.

The essential oil should also be free of chemical contaminants.  Pesticide or solvent residues can diminish or alter the therapeutic effectiveness of essential oils.

Want more?Read:The Case Against Therapeutic Grade

100% pure essential oils, therapeutic grade, medical grade, clinical grade, locally sourced, and organic essential oils. What does it all REALLY mean?

Certified Essential Oils

What people think it means:

People tend to believe that certified essential oils are certified by a governmental agency.  Usually they believe FDA certifies them to be pure and superior to other brands that are not labeled “certified”.  If they don’t think the government certified them, sometimes they’ll think that an aromatherapy industry group did.

What it actually means:

Essential oil certifications are internal certifications.  An internal certification means: “We promise our product is up to our standards.”  They “certify” themselves and hope that they’ve impressed you.

In short, the certification sounds official, but isn’t given by any government or even industry standards body.  It is not a reliable or un-biased measure of quality.

What to look for instead:

What does the company do to make sure of quality?  Do they do extensive testing?  Where does their quality control begin?   When they buy the oil from a third-party or do they actually grow and distill their own plants?  The majority of companies buy oils in bulk from third parties. Then they put their own labels on them.  That’s why understanding the supply chain and quality control process of the company you choose is crucial.  It is the only way to objectively determine quality.

Want more?Read:The Truth about Certified Essential Oils

100% pure essential oils, therapeutic grade, medical grade, clinical grade, locally sourced, and organic essential oils. What does it all REALLY mean?

Organic Essential Oils

What people think it means:

People rightly believe that the USDA Organic means that the essential oil was not grown with synthetic pesticides or herbicides.  They also assume that this means that the essential oil is the best botanically.   People expect them to work better than other essential oils.

What it actually means:

The only thing that USDA Organic means is that no synthetic pesticides or herbicides were used on the plants.  It does not mean that the company harvested the plants at the right time.  It doesn’t mean that the plants aged before distilling for the right time (if needed).  It also doesn’t mean that the company tested the oils for potency.  Organic only means that the oil is free of chemical contaminants from growing.  It has no influence on the usefulness or potency of the essential oil.

What to look for instead:

Essential oil production is very complex.  The more that the seller knows about the growing and distilling, the better.  Organic growing practices are important.  The company also needs to know about harvesting, aging, and distilling to be able to make a good oil.  Look into the company’s experience and level of involvement.  That is the most important part.

Want more? Read: Are Young Living’s Essential Oils Organic?

100% pure essential oils, therapeutic grade, medical grade, clinical grade, locally sourced, and organic essential oils. What does it all REALLY mean?

Clinical Grade Essential Oils

What people think it means:

In my experience, people believe that clinical grade essential oils are higher quality than even therapeutic grade essential oils.  They believe that these oils are exclusively preferred by hospitals, research facilities, and clinical professionals. They also believe that an outside scientific or governmental association has created clinical standards for essential oils.

What it actually means:

Companies give themselves the clinical grade label, similar to certified essential oils.  There is no outside definition.  Researchers and scientists regularly use different brands of essential oils.  Each researcher or clinician typically has their favorite brands based on experience, quality, and other factors.

Additionally, clinicians and researchers already directly contact essential oil companies for quality and constituent information.  Not only that but many do independent testing to find quality and constituent profiles.  Actual clinicians aren’t typically impressed by this term.  It is more there to impress a non-clinical audience with its perceived exclusivity.

There is no medical, scientific, or government agency that awards a clinical or medical grade designation for essential oil.

What to look for instead:

You will get better information by looking into the quality control and supply chain control that the company uses.  Involvement in the process to ensure the purity and potency of the oils is key.

100% pure essential oils, therapeutic grade, medical grade, clinical grade, locally sourced, and organic essential oils. What does it all REALLY mean?

Locally Sourced Essential Oils

What people think it means:

People typically perceive that local is better, and for some sorts of products that is true.  They view a locally sourced essential oil as the cream of the crop. It’s sort of like a fine artisan bread or a craft beer.  Local growers often have grown and distilled for generations.

What it actually means:

There is no objective meaning for this term. Unless an essential oil has chemotypes (different chemical compositions), then this is not necessarily helpful.  While purchasing essential oils from local sources may support low-opportunity areas, there are some possible drawbacks.

Just because a company sources (purchased) locally,  there is no guarantee that it’s good quality.  Did they harvest and distill the plants at the correct time?  Did they distill the essential oil properly?  Many times small local producers are not using up to date growing practices or distilling equipment and methods.

What to look for instead:

Ultimately, the constituent profile is what makes an essential oil active and therapeutic.  I get my constituent profiles per oil from a company specific reference book.  Individual batch GC/MS reports are only useful if you can read a GC/MS report.  99% of essential oil users can’t.  I trust these profiles because my preferred company won’t sell an oil that doesn’t comply to these ranges.

If an essential oil grower is working with third-party local growers, do they help with proper distilling and growing practices?  Do they help build up to date distilling facilities on site? Otherwise, the plant material can degrade during transport from the farm to a distilling facility.  These are a few things that can help decide the benefit to a locally grown essential oil.

What did you think?   Did any of those terms surprise you?  Finding a good quality essential oil is well worth digging deeper beyond these marketing terms.

Want more?  Read:  Are Young Living Essential Oils REALLY better?

What other terms have you seen?  Do you wonder what they actually mean?  Sound off in the comments!


DIY After Sun Aloe Vera Gel with Lavender Essential Oil

This simple aloe vera and lavender gel is perfect to use after a day at the pool or out in the sun. Only 3 ingredients and 1 minute to make!

It’s getting hot out here!

I grew up on the west coast of sunny Florida and I spent plenty of time year round outdoors.  If it wasn’t the beach it was the pool or somewhere else outside.  And since Florida is the land of perpetual summer (like 11 months out of the year) my poor pale skin didn’t get much break from the sun’s rays!

I remember always putting aloe vera on my skin after a long day outside and how wonderful it felt on my skin.  It was neon green goop, and it smelled like coconuts, or something.  In retrospect, it didn’t really resemble aloe vera, but what’s a girl to do who hadn’t actually grown any plants as a teenager?

Did you use the green goo?

This year we’ve taking the kids to the pool a lot!  My youngest is always begging to go outside and play or to jump in our backyard pool.  I think that’s just what happens when kids are trapped inside the house in the land of long winters.

So since it is almost swim lesson season and my kids are spending a lot of time in our above ground pool, we need an after sun solution that works and is not filled with questionable junk.

You see I looked up that “green goo” I used to call aloe and realized, not so much.

You should check your favorite after sun products, you may be surprised at the not so natural things that they contain.

Time for something safer

My daughter’s little pink cheeks need something that is safe, you know?  I don’t want to put chemicals on that sweet skin.  So I did some reading and came up with a simpler, safer solution.

Actual aloe vera.

Revolutionary, right? 

When we lived in Florida we had aloe plants everywhere, outside the front door, in a pot by the kitchen sink, everywhere.  Aloe is super easy to grow there, but here in the dry, wild west?  Not so much.

So decided that this DIY After Sun Gel needed a little help from the health food store.  And it was easier than I had thought it would be.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Want to see how simple it is to make? Check out the video of me making it below!

Watch how to make the DIY After Sun Aloe Vera Gel:

But you’re probably looking for a printable recipe for this after sun aloe vera gel, aren’t you?

Well here you go!

DIY After Sun Aloe Vera Gel with Lavender Essential Oil
 
Author:
Recipe type: DIY
Prep time:
Total time:
 
This simple, 3 ingredient DIY After Sun Aloe Vera Gel is cooling, soothing, and the perfect thing to smooth on your skin after a long day outside in the sun.
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup pure aloe vera gel
  • ½ tsp vitamin e oil
  • 24 drops Lavender Essential Oil (I recommend Young Living brand)
  • 3 oz. silicone bottle
Instructions
  1. Mix all of the ingredients in a small glass bowl.
  2. Transfer the mixture to a 3 oz. silicone tube.
  3. Store in the fridge between uses for a cool, soothing treat for the skin!
Notes
The quality of essential oils you use will definitely impact your results from this project. We recommend Young Living brand and had fantastic results with it in this recipe.

How did it work?

My little daughter spent most of the afternoon last week in our little pool and her skin was in need of some care, and this aloe gel worked very well.  She commented “Mama, I love this!  Can you put more on my face?”  We applied it all over her face, arms and shoulders (three times over the course of the afternoon and evening) and in the morning her skin looked and felt great.

So whip up a batch and throw it in your beach bag or backpack and enjoy how fantastic your skin feels, even after a long day in the sun!

Tell me, where are you headed outdoors this summer?  Will you be taking this DIY after sun aloe and lavender gel with you?

This simple, 3 ingredient DIY After Sun Aloe Vera Gel is cooling, soothing, and the perfect thing to smooth on your skin after a long day outside in the sun.

 


DIY Essential Oil Deodorant | Quick and Easy!

 

This DIY essential oil deodorant recipe is my personal favorite. It takes just a few minutes to make and lasts a long time.You know how it goes:  girl meets deodorant.  Deodorant works.  Deodorant smells nice.

All is well.

Girl discovers deodorant contains nasty chemicals.  Girl wants to break up with deodorant.  Girl looks for more natural and non-toxic deodorant options.  Feels frustrated by what is available.

Girl buys deodorant rock.  Tries it.  Rock starts to smell like girl.  End of relationship.

Girl buys expensive all natural deodorant.  Gives it a week.  Still smells like a feed lot.

Girl buys less expensive “all-natural” deodorant at the health food store.  Stops stinking!  On a whim looks up the ingredients on the SkinDeep Database.  Girl realizes this deodorant is just as toxic as the one she ditched in the first place.

Girl finds herself back at square one.  In need of a non-toxic deodorant that works.

That was me, and then I found this DIY essential oil deodorant recipe!

I’ve tweaked it and tested it and made it well and thoroughly my own.  But I am super glad to share the “secret” with you, too.

Watch how I make my DIY Essential Oil Deodorant below:

Here are the things you’ll need:

Here’s how you do it:

  1. Gently melt the coconut oil over low heat (if it isn’t already liquid at room temperature)
  2. Take the oil off the heat and add the cornstarch, baking soda, and essential oils.
  3. Stir until completely combined and as smooth as you can make it.
  4. Allow to thicken up before use.
  5. When ready to use, just scoop a small amount (less than a dime) out of the jar and rub into your armpits!  Re-apply as needed.

NOTE:  This is a deodorant recipe, meaning if used and re-applied it should help keep the smell away.  It won’t keep you from sweating.  Which is actually good, because sweating is good for you! 

The great thing is, that once you’ve made this essential oil deodorant, it will last a very long time.  Not only does it last a long time, but it is very cost-effective.

Want to print this DIY Essential Oil Deodorant Recipe?

DIY Essential Oil Deodorant | Quick and Easy!
 
Author:
Prep time:
Total time:
 
Ingredients
  • a glass pint sized jar, preferably wide-mouth
  • ½ cup extra virgin coconut oil (not fractionated coconut oil)
  • ½ cup cornstarch (or arrowroot powder)
  • ½ cup baking soda
  • 30-40 drops essential oil of your choice
Instructions
  1. Gently melt the coconut oil over low heat (if it isn't already liquid at room temperature)
  2. Take the oil off the heat and add the cornstarch, baking soda, and essential oils.
  3. Stir until completely combined and as smooth as you can make it.
  4. Allow to thicken up before use.
  5. When ready to use, just scoop a small amount (less than a dime) out of the jar and rub into your armpits! Re-apply as needed.
Notes
I like Young Living brand Tea Tree myself. Other oils you could try would be Purification blend, Lavender plus Lime, Lemon plus Frankincense, Geranium plus Lemon. Just use what you like!

 

So, what essential oil combo will you be using in your next batch?  Let me know in the comments, I’m always looking to try new combos!